Student Life

I arrive to class—late—and find myself in a half-filled drawing studio.
At the front of the room, a rather fit older gentleman is posing. Naked. 

I quickly stumble over to an empty easel nearby and am so glad I had a sketchbook and pens in my bag. I just take out my supplies and start to quickly gesture-draw his stance. And try not to focus too hard on his nipple rings.

I'M A STUDENT AGAIN. 

Back in the studio. Sketching nudes. Hauling a huge bag of paints, brushes, canvases around NYC.

AND IT FEELS AMAZING.

Well, at first it feels awkward. It's Tuesday after Memorial Day and the Friday before was my last day at a full-time agency gig. 4 days before this harried moment in the studio, I was having night terrors over a deck I was never going to present. I worked until 11PM on my last day of work on a pitch for work—that I wanted my team to win—but knew I'd never even work on to begin with.

back to basics.

This summer, I'm taking an intensive course in illustration at Pratt. It's been a bit challenging, but I'm so glad I'm doing it. 

 My submission for a rebranding / business card project. That's me—as an illustrator!

My submission for a rebranding / business card project. That's me—as an illustrator!

 

I enrolled in this class to reconnect with why I loved to design in the first place. After months and months of rather crappy briefs (from really great people!) that went no where, it was hard to remember why I went down this career path in the first place. I was so jaded by my agency gigs—one that wanted me to be a manager, then one that didn't really know what they wanted me to be. It was like serial-dating but with jobs. And I fell out of love. I wasn't even sure if I found love, I'd even accept it.

 

This class is helping me get back into it. Back to just making things. No briefs. No budgets. No brand guidelines.
It's challenging me to stick to my decisions. To mix my own blacks. (Sup burnt umber.) To consider depth and detail—or lack thereof. 

 

To all my creative homies—and even homies who don't consider themselves creatives—take a class. I highly recommend learning or re-learning a skill. Even if it's just a weekend workshop. Take the time. Feel yourself.

Lessa Chung