Tokyo Tango | Youbi Undies

Learning the days of the week is one of the first things you need when studying a new language. It comes in handy when you're making plans, writing in your Tumblog, or figuring out what day the coffee beans were roasted. (A recent challenge I ran into.) It's also pretty key to know what day the week starts when you're looking at a calendar. The difference between a Sunday or a Monday start is a pretty big gamechanger.  

 

Instead of the ubiquitous lineup of: M    T     W     T      F     S     S
Japanese calendars often feature: 月 火 水 木 金 土 日

 

The unique kanji character for each day has it's own meaning. So by learning the days of the week, you learn these 7 individual pieces of kanji PLUS the kanji ending for weekdays (曜日 - ようび - youbi). Which is pretty dope IMHO. 

 

YOUBI UNDIES

/ yo-oo-bee-un-deez /

Studying this set of kanji made me think of a set of those Day of the Week underwear. The undergarment usually made a cameo in 90's movies when some aloof character checks his underwear to comment they wore "Thursday" underwear on Monday—again. It was just so cool to not give a shit!

I thought those undies were great because I knew it was something I would never have. My parents would never spend money on something as frivolous as labeled underwear. They expected me to have my shit together enough to wear a fresh pair each day. 

So I'm making my own.

Please enjoy this fresh set of undies. Feel free to wear whichever whenever you'd like.

         The first character (月) means moon. Monday = Moonday.

         The first character (月) means moon. Monday = Moonday.

       Get lit on Tuesday because 火 means fire. 

       Get lit on Tuesday because 火 means fire. 

         Climb to the top of the trees (木) on Thursday. 

         Climb to the top of the trees (木) on Thursday. 

         Go to farmer's market on Saturday to get produce fresh from the soil (土).

         Go to farmer's market on Saturday to get produce fresh from the soil (土).

         Camels keep water (水) in their humps on Hump Day.

         Camels keep water (水) in their humps on Hump Day.

         Friday is payday, so let it rain gold (金).

         Friday is payday, so let it rain gold (金).

         Literally, sun (日) day.

         Literally, sun (日) day.


The captions are just simple nonsense to help remember the kanji and it's meaning.

HEADS UP
The pronunciation of the individual kanji sounds pretty different from how you say it together with the kanji that make it a weekday.  So only use these pronunciations when referencing the day of a week.

 

In case you're wondering why I made these, read more about Tokyo Tango

Lessa Chung